Pink!  Oh, how I adore pink (at the moment)!

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A reader presented me with an idea for a post.  Her husband thinks pink is too girly, she loves pink.  How can you incorporate pink into a room without it freaking the hubs out and seeming too girly?

And, proof that taste and style does change – I am currently a big pink fan myself!   Haven’t always been.  But, you probably already knew that by looking at the beginnings of my craft room design.

One of the keys to using pink, and there are tons of different tones of pink being used right now, is to use it in conjunction with masculine elements.  All feminine elements will create a very very feminine room.  It’s all about the juxtaposition.

1.  Use it off the beaten path, in a space that isn’t in your immediate site line.  Then, use just a couple of accents in the other areas to pull it together.  The dark gray textured walls are the masculine element here.  Ideally, for both sexes, you could remove some of the other feminine elements.  For instance, make the white table a more substantial dark wood table.

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2.  Use it as an accent color.  This means it’s just a small part of the room.  The metal and hard lines are the masculine elements here.

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3.  Use it as occasional décor.  In other words, just get it out occasionally for something like a table setting.  The black and the dark wood are the masculine elements here.

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Or, more subtly.

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4.  Go for a more coral tone.  Coral is a more orange-pink that doesn’t immediately induce feelings of girly-ness.  The hard surfaces and dark wood are the masculine elements here.

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5.  Use it on the floor.  Sometimes a simple area rug can introduce some new colors that are not found elsewhere in the room.  That way, it’s not overwhelming.  The blue and dark roman shade are the masculine elements here.  To make it more masculine, try using more navy and less ribbon.

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Or, how about just a solid rug like this.

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6.  Use it in a quirky manner.  Make it just part of the quirkiness of the room.  Note that most other elements below are masculine in nature.  And, the pink is just one pop of bold, bright pink that is close to fuchsia in tone.

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Another similar space…  which I love the quirkiness of!

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7.  Use it on a piece of furniture.  We touched on this above, but here is another example.  This time the pink is almost a red. And here, the gray is the masculine element.

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Or, on chairs that are against a very masculine backdrop.

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8.  Use it in the form of flowers.  Very fresh and subtle.  The hard surfaces are the masculine element in this room.

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Another with pink flowers.

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9.  Use it on upholstery.  They used a very dark pink here.  The dark colors are the masculine element.

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10.  Use it on a throw or pillow.  This is a simple way to add pink without a huge commitment.  The cow hide rug and tree mural are the masculine elements.

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Or, on a pillow.  For a less feminine feel, try less delicate patterns and fewer, larger items.

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Hope that gives you ideas on how you can incorporate pink into a room for both sexes.

Of course, if unlike the reader who sent the question in, your hubby doesn’t mind the pink, you could just go for it like this.

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Remember most good designs have both feminine and masculine elements.  When using pink, if it’s for both sexes, make sure there is a lot of masculine to go around as well.

Ways to add masculine elements – dark tones, rough textures, straight lines, hard surfaces, and larger simple pieces.   Ways to increase the feminine feel of a room – softness, lightness, delicate patterns, and smaller pieces.

Thanks for submitting the post idea, Kristina!

kristysig